The most careless reader, [Hodgson] justly remarks, cannot contemplate but with feelings of wonder and admiration, this extensive terra incognita of literature opening upon us in regions which he had most likely been in the habit of deeming rude and barbarous. Nor will the Oriental scholar be without his pleasurable reflections upon the high probability thence arising that a large portion of the Sanskrit literature of India, so long lost to its native soil, may be in part, at least, recovered by means of the Buddhist translations and compilations.
Asiatic Journal: January–April 1831

photo credit

The Tibetan Tengyur Collection

comprises of ~128,812 pages and ~5000 titles in 16 categories

NB. There is also a section called Indexes (skt: sūcilipi, tib: sna tshogs), which contains ~375 pages.

The philosopher, if he becomes conversant with the style of Sanskrit compositions, will be tempted not only to interpret Indian ideas in European terms, but also to try the converse operation and to interpret European ideas in Indian terms…

I would be amply satisfied if I only succeed to arouse his attention and through him to introduce Indian positive philosophers into the community of their European brotherhood.
T.H. Stcherbatsky, 1930

photo credit

Translating the Tengyur Treatises into English

This collection of literature has been of immeasurable benefit to us Tibetans over the centuries, so we are very happy to share it with all the people of the world. As someone who has been personally inspired by the works it contains, I firmly believe that the methods for cultivating wisdom and compassion originally developed in India and described in these books preserved in Tibetan translation will be of great benefit to many scholars, philosophers, and scientists, as well as ordinary people.
H.H. XIV Dalai Lama, AIBS Letter of Support, 2007

photo credit

AIBS Published Translations

Treasury of Buddhist Sciences: The Translated Scriptures & Treatises

This is our founding series, fulfilling our mission to translate the Tengyur — the Tibetan canon of scientific treatises (śāstra), which constitutes Indo-Tibetan civilization's contribution to the contemporary arts and sciences.

<
  • TRANSLATIONS

  • STUDIES & REFERENCE WORKS

  • FORTHCOMING PUBLICATIONS

>

Treasury of Buddhist Sciences: Associated Literature

The Tibetan scholar-practitioner tradition's literature is an immense treasury of insightful analytic and instructional works on the scriptures and scientific treatises of the Buddhist canon. This series is devoted to that literature, the basis of a still vibrant curriculum of teaching and experiential practice.

<
  • TRANSLATIONS

  • FORTHCOMING PUBLICATIONS

>

Treasury of Indic Sciences

For over fifteen hundred years, the scholars representing the numerous Buddhist traditions were actively engaged in dialogue and debate with representatives of the Vedist, Hindu, Jainist, and other religious and secular traditions. In the cosmopolitan milieu of classical India, the shared arts and sciences of all these traditions were constantly refined and developed. To rekindle awareness of this broader interactive context, quite in keeping with the tradition of the great classical Buddhist universities such as Nālandā, we are expanding our Buddhistic mandate by publishing a companion series entitled the Treasury of the Indic Sciences. In this series, we present translations of influential classics from the whole diversity of Indic traditions, including the six Vedist visionary philosophies (darśana), as well as the Jainist and the more secular traditions.

<
  • TRANSLATIONS

  • STUDIES & REFERENCE WORKS

  • FORTHCOMING PUBLICATIONS

>